Dr. King’s Strategies for Socially Engaged Art





On 28 February 2019, the DC Public Libraries invited a number of speakers to share their answer to the question, "What is the meaning of Dr. King's work/legacy in Washington DC today?" In this talk, I address how I apply King's teachings of soul force, drum major instinct, creative tension, and beloved community to art and art therapy. [duration 6:37]





Response art: Using creative activity to deepen exhibit engagement





This talk was presented 21 October 2016 as part of the book launch for Fostering Empathy in Museums. I described my chapter on encouraging museum and exhibit viewers to create response art to their emotions and thoughts in order to heighten empathy. [duration 7:32]





Art Therapy and Behavioral Health: Exploring the Continuum of Practice [Clip]





This presentation was recorded at the 2016 American Art Therapy Association annual conference in Baltimore, MD. In this clip, I discuss some of the diverse traditions of art therapy that demonstrate its compatibility with the behavioral health paradigm. To listen to the full one hour presentation and to receive continuing education credits, visit the American Art Therapy Association Institute of Continuing Education. The website is: secure.trainingcampus.net/UAS/Modules/TREES/windex.aspx and the product item is: "0808 - Art Therapy and Behavioral Health: Exploring the Continuum of Practice." [duration 7:23]





Color Your Own TEDx NYU





This talk was presented on 15 April 2016 at Color Party: TEDx NYU. Although coloring is often described as a relaxing activity, art can also increase understanding and promote insight. By sharing brief case examples from art therapy, I demonstrated the value of art making for increasing awareness of self, others, and the world. [duration 13:41]




M.L. King’s Legacy for Socially Engaged Arts





This talk was delivered on 3 February 2016 as part of The George Washington University's King Week 2016. King’s tenets of nonviolent resistance (soul force, drum major instinct, creative tension, beloved community) can serve as the foundation for a community arts project focused on mental health stigma. Informed by art therapy practices, the presentation offers strategies for arts-based cross-cultural dialogue when addressing a range of social issues. [duration 28:27]





Art Therapy Ethics of Exhibiting and Displaying Client Artwork





This recording is from the panel presentation "Ethical Decision Making When Faced with Uncertainty" at the annual conference of the American Art Therapy Association in Savannah, GA in July 2012. I review the Ethical Principles for Art Therapists and relevant literature to arrive at recommendations for how to respectfully exhibit art created in art therapy. [duration 23:28]





“a better community and society”: Art Therapy Ethics and Social Justice





This recording is from the panel presentation "Art Therapy Ethical Practice and Multicultural/ Diversity Competence" at the annual conference of the American Art Therapy Association in Seattle, WA in June 2013. The panel was co-initiated by the Ethics Committee and Multicultural Committee. I describe the intersection of the Ethical Principles for Art Therapists with social justice as illustrated by a community arts project aimed to reduce stigma towards people living with mental illness." [duration 16:53]





A Season of Mental Health Awareness - Opening Remarks





This recording is from the opening of the art exhibit "A Season of Mental Health Awareness: understanding and support" at Ma On Shan Plaza in Hong Kong from October 2012. The exhibit was created by artists living with mental illness who wanted to show something about themselves to others. The goal was to challenge stereotypes and raise awareness on people living with mental illness. [duration 4:03]





Using Art Exhibits and Art Responses to Foster Empathy for Social Change





TThis recording is from the panel presentation "Symbolic and Imaginative Processes of Social Change" at the Art and Social Change Conference hosted by Lesley University in Netanya, Israel in April 2012. Using the myth of Perseus and Medusa as a framework, I explore how images that reflect social issues can be engaged for transformative social change that begins in art making. [duration 13:57]